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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 5,064
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

Service dogs transform the lives of their charges. From assisting the blind and deaf to helping returning veterans cope with PTSD, the positive impact of their help upon their owners cannot be denied.

People with diabetes can also benefit from being paired with a service dog. With the proper training, dogs can use their superior sense of smell to alert their owners to fluctuating blood sugar. This is especially important among Type 1 diabetics who suffer from a condition known as Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents a person from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

For those with Hypoglycemic Unawareness, an alert dog might mean the difference between life and death.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

There's no denying a diabetic alert dog could save countless lives and improve the quality of life for their owners. So why don't more people have them?

Their cost.

According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average person, this enormous price tag can prevent people with diabetes from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

People with diabetes shouldn't be asked to shoulder this financial burden on their own when they pay insurance premiums! Tell the U.S.'s top five Insurance providers and Obamacare to cover the costs of these dogs for any diabetic whose doctors' recommend them.

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To U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and the CEOs of WellPoint Insurance, CIGNA Health Insurance Company, Aetna, Humana, and United Healthcare

I am writing to urge you to add diabetic alert dogs to your insurance policies. I am dismayed that these effective assistants to managing and maintaining awareness of blood glucose levels are effectively uncovered by the insurance industry.

These alert dogs provide life-saving care to people with diabetes, especially those who suffer from Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents diabetics from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

But, as you are no doubt aware, the cost of training a diabetic alert dog can be massive. According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average diabetic, this enormous price tag can prevent them from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

As the nation's most prominent health insurance providers, I'm asking you to lead the charge on making diabetic alert dogs more accessible to your clients. Lives are on the line. And an alert dog could make lived with diabetes easier for so many.

Please, help defray the costs of acquiring a diabetic alert dog. Add these life-saving companions to your policies.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Feb 20, 2018 Sheila Hall These dog are very expensive insurance and grants can help the biggest part of expense. They do save lives
Feb 18, 2018 Richard Bosboom
Feb 15, 2018 Pamela Hermes
Feb 15, 2018 Suzanne DesChambeau ABSOLUTELY! This is imperative for many w/ diabetes. It is life saving for some people & these well trained dogs are expense - not something a sick person w/ lots of medical bills can afford. Please make these dogs covered by insurance for diabetics. Thx!
Feb 14, 2018 Lisa Lease
Feb 12, 2018 Brent Sirois
Feb 12, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Feb 12, 2018 Mark Lungo
Feb 12, 2018 Melissa Rodriguez
Feb 12, 2018 Michelle Santhanam
Feb 12, 2018 Michelle Haag
Feb 12, 2018 VIRGINIA HEINRICH I speak from experience, being Type 1 Diabetic. Sometimes it's difficult feeling the sudden onset of low blood sugar coming on, especially the longer you have diabetes.
Feb 12, 2018 Dana Levy
Feb 12, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Feb 12, 2018 Peggy Keller
Feb 12, 2018 Di Griffiths
Feb 12, 2018 Tricia W Everyone should have access to life-saving advantages. I got very lucky when my little cat Amazing Gracie turned out to be a Diabetic Alert Animal. - untrained. Something to think about ...
Feb 12, 2018 Barbara Robinson
Feb 12, 2018 Liz Olivas
Feb 12, 2018 kathleen conroy
Feb 12, 2018 Teresa Foster
Feb 12, 2018 Heather Johnson
Feb 12, 2018 Sheri Applebaum I have been diabetic almost 50 years and I have hypoglycemic unawareness. I recently passed out from extremely low blood sugar and fell down my stairs, causing a traumatic brain injury. A diabetic alert dog could have prevented this from happening!
Feb 12, 2018 Angela May
Feb 12, 2018 kelly mallon-dandignac any form of health insurance is to preserve health and save lives!!!!!
Feb 12, 2018 NADIA BURNS
Feb 12, 2018 Wesley Frank AS a retired fire fighter who responded to emergencies like Diabetic Coma and now as a Diabetic myself I would beg this new tool be added to the insurance programs. Thanks Wess
Feb 12, 2018 Nancy Farley
Feb 12, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Feb 12, 2018 Judith Winters
Feb 12, 2018 Annicka Chetty
Feb 5, 2018 Elizabeth Wolff
Feb 5, 2018 Janice Banks
Feb 4, 2018 Sandra Richards
Feb 3, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 30, 2018 Barbara Leary
Jan 29, 2018 Christopher Davis
Jan 28, 2018 Roxanne McCullough
Jan 28, 2018 marianne cresci
Jan 22, 2018 Kevin Dahl
Jan 22, 2018 Eric Beck
Jan 15, 2018 Shashawna Foland
Jan 5, 2018 Beverly Folkes
Jan 2, 2018 David Schaechtel
Jan 2, 2018 Julia Russo
Jan 2, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jan 2, 2018 Pattie Treece
Jan 2, 2018 Valerie Cranmer
Jan 2, 2018 Melody Martin
Jan 2, 2018 (Name not displayed)

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