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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 4,992
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

Service dogs transform the lives of their charges. From assisting the blind and deaf to helping returning veterans cope with PTSD, the positive impact of their help upon their owners cannot be denied.

People with diabetes can also benefit from being paired with a service dog. With the proper training, dogs can use their superior sense of smell to alert their owners to fluctuating blood sugar. This is especially important among Type 1 diabetics who suffer from a condition known as Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents a person from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

For those with Hypoglycemic Unawareness, an alert dog might mean the difference between life and death.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

There's no denying a diabetic alert dog could save countless lives and improve the quality of life for their owners. So why don't more people have them?

Their cost.

According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average person, this enormous price tag can prevent people with diabetes from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

People with diabetes shouldn't be asked to shoulder this financial burden on their own when they pay insurance premiums! Tell the U.S.'s top five Insurance providers and Obamacare to cover the costs of these dogs for any diabetic whose doctors' recommend them.

Sign Here






To U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and the CEOs of WellPoint Insurance, CIGNA Health Insurance Company, Aetna, Humana, and United Healthcare

I am writing to urge you to add diabetic alert dogs to your insurance policies. I am dismayed that these effective assistants to managing and maintaining awareness of blood glucose levels are effectively uncovered by the insurance industry.

These alert dogs provide life-saving care to people with diabetes, especially those who suffer from Hypoglycemic Unawareness. This condition prevents diabetics from feeling when his or her blood sugar is rapidly falling or is dangerously low. Other symptoms, such as stomach cramps, nausea, dizziness, or even seizures, are the only hints sufferers receive without testing their blood sugar. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can even result in unconsciousness, coma, or death in as few as twenty minutes.

Diabetic alert dogs are trained to recognize symptoms of fluctuating blood sugar, sometimes both highs and lows, and alert their charge to their condition, even waking a sleeping person should the need arise.

But, as you are no doubt aware, the cost of training a diabetic alert dog can be massive. According to Dogs4Diabetics, a diabetes alert dog typically costs around $20,000, but other sources cite the price tag as high as $50,000. For the average diabetic, this enormous price tag can prevent them from acquiring the service dog assistance they require.

As the nation's most prominent health insurance providers, I'm asking you to lead the charge on making diabetic alert dogs more accessible to your clients. Lives are on the line. And an alert dog could make lived with diabetes easier for so many.

Please, help defray the costs of acquiring a diabetic alert dog. Add these life-saving companions to your policies.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Nov 16, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Nov 12, 2017 Lois Freeman
Nov 8, 2017 Beah Robinson
Nov 5, 2017 Robert Cooke, Jr.
Nov 5, 2017 Kathy Sparrow
Nov 4, 2017 Ford Smith
Nov 3, 2017 Esther Clayson
Nov 3, 2017 Abby Anis We are currently waiting for our DAD to finish training for our 8 year old who has Type 1. I believe any person who has diabetes should have the option to have an alert dog. They are hero's to their owners.
Nov 2, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Nov 2, 2017 Jennifer Blanchard
Nov 2, 2017 Tara Dana This is a resource that most diabetics can benefit from but can not access due to cost. Please help make this accessible through insurance! It can be lifesaving!
Nov 2, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Oct 28, 2017 Deborah Moore
Oct 25, 2017 Kimberly Wallace
Oct 24, 2017 Karrie Vukelic
Oct 10, 2017 SANDRA VITO
Oct 8, 2017 Maria Larranaga
Oct 1, 2017 Joanne Raby
Sep 30, 2017 Terri Harris-Downing
Sep 19, 2017 JoAnn Evans
Sep 7, 2017 Teresa Ashley
Aug 31, 2017 Kevin Long I've been a type 1 diabetic for a long time. But, I've only known for 12 years. I've almost died 9 times, with D.K.A. It is no laughing matter, and I hope one day a cure. Thank you.
Aug 24, 2017 Gil Hackel
Aug 23, 2017 D Roberts
Aug 19, 2017 John Moszyk
Aug 18, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 18, 2017 SYLVIA MITCHELL
Aug 18, 2017 Jaye Duncan
Aug 18, 2017 Nick Zarafonetis I am diabetic and service dog is a fantastic way of assisting Type 1 diabetics.
Aug 18, 2017 Lisa Zarafonetis
Aug 18, 2017 Lea Valerio
Aug 18, 2017 jack wenger
Aug 18, 2017 karen garbini
Aug 18, 2017 PATRICIA WELCH I have an untrained diabetic alert cat. She saved my life one morning, and continues to check me out every day. I know how important it is to have an animal there to make sure you're waking up. There should be no question of funding.
Aug 18, 2017 Rita Addison This need is urgent until a diabetes can be prevented.
Aug 18, 2017 Susan Phelps
Aug 18, 2017 Linda Reeves
Aug 18, 2017 louis saltzman
Aug 18, 2017 rachel goldberg
Aug 18, 2017 Howard Hastings As most Americans don't realize that they can easily become diabetic, this program of using trained diabetic dogs can be a real Godsend,especially with children who suffer from this disease.
Aug 18, 2017 Tina Boyce
Aug 18, 2017 jeannie lee
Aug 18, 2017 Rosie Bermudez Save a dog. SAVE A LIFE!
Aug 18, 2017 Duane Davis
Aug 18, 2017 Ronald Guglielmino
Aug 18, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Aug 18, 2017 Deborah Bratcher
Aug 18, 2017 tony pallini
Aug 18, 2017 Ed Zehel
Aug 18, 2017 Ronald Wyant

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