Skip navigation

no spam, unsubscribe anytime.
Skip navigation
Goal: 30,000 Progress: 225
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

When it comes to feeding our families, there should be no second guessing whether commercially available food is safe or nutritious. For too long, the lax requirements dealing with food expiration dates have prompted confusing labeling at best, resulting in hundreds of thousands of tons in wasted food and hungry households.

Apart from baby formula, there is no federally mandated system in the United States to classify dates by which products must be sold by, are freshest by, and expire, and the differences between. Fewer than 25 states currently require dating labels at all, and where it is required, the date may refer to some characteristic other than food quality.

The USDA maintains that "use-by" and "sell-by" dates may not determine when a product needs to be thrown away, and that products may still be "safe, wholesome, and of good quality" after that period if handled properly. But such obscure details are lost on many, leading to at least 40 percent of all food in the US going to waste, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The inefficiencies of this system are putting the nutritional needs of a significant and growing number of Americans at risk. In a 2015 report by Feeding America, it was found that 42.2 million Americans lived in food insecure households, including 29.1 million adults and 13.1 million children.

While staggering, these numbers cannot be reduced without an adequate and easily employed solution to determining quality and freshness. Such an option has been proposed by the private and nonprofit collaborative ReFED, formed in 2015 to draw up a "Roadmap to Reduce U.S. Food Waste."

ReFED's plan, standardizing date labeling throughout the country, could feasibly prevent 400,000 tons of food going to waste in its first year alone.

Other innovations in label design could provide solutions to the problem as well. In a Wired article from July 2016, a strip that changes color to indicate freshness over time was proposed, as were design alterations to ingredient details that simplify and emphasize important nutritional facts.

We need legislation at the federal level which creates a nationally recognized system for expiration dates, requiring labels indicate a food's peak freshness date as well as the date after which the food is unsafe to eat. The technology to do so is not only available, but easily implemented.

Sign below and tell the FDA's Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements that national standards for expiration dates need to be put in place now!

Sign Here






Dear Food and Drug Administration, Office of Nutrition, Labeling, and Dietary Supplements,

For far too long, the lax requirements dealing with food expiration dates have prompted confusing labeling at best, resulting in hundreds of thousands of tons in wasted food and hungry households.

When it comes to feeding our families, there should be no second guessing whether commercially available food is safe or nutritious.

Apart from baby formula, there is no federally mandated system in the United States to classify dates by which products must be sold by, are freshest by, and expire, and the differences between. Fewer than 25 states currently require dating labels at all, and where it is required, the date may refer to some characteristic other than food quality.

The USDA maintains that "use-by" and "sell-by" dates may not determine when a product needs to be thrown away, and that products may still be "safe, wholesome, and of good quality" after that period if handled properly. But such obscure details are lost on many, leading to at least 40 percent of all food in the US going to waste, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council.

The inefficiencies of this system are putting the nutritional needs of a significant and growing number of Americans at risk. In a 2015 report by Feeding America, 42.2 million Americans lived in food insecure households, including 29.1 million adults and 13.1 million children.

While staggering, these numbers cannot be reduced without an adequate and easily employed solution to determining quality and freshness. Such an option has been proposed by the private and nonprofit collaborative ReFED, formed in 2015 to draw up a "Roadmap to Reduce U.S. Food Waste."

ReFED's plan, standardizing date labeling throughout the country, could feasibly prevent 400,000 tons of food waste even year.

Other innovations in label design could provide solutions to the problem as well. In a Wired article from July 2016, a strip that changes color to indicate freshness over time was proposed, as were design alterations to ingredient details that simplify and emphasize important nutritional facts.

We as Americans deserve a better system, and the technology to do so is not only available, but easily implemented.

I demand legislation at the federal level to create nationally recognized guidelines for expiration dates, requiring labels indicate a food's peak freshness date as well as the date after which the food is unsafe to eat.

 

Sincerely,

Petition Signatures


Dec 5, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Dec 4, 2017 Richard Bosboom
Dec 4, 2017 Richard Bosboom
Dec 3, 2017 Amber Lopez
Nov 14, 2017 Marsha Kimball
Oct 28, 2017 Deborah Moore
Oct 9, 2017 J Barney
Oct 6, 2017 Cheryl Logan
Oct 4, 2017 Carly Koehn
Sep 7, 2017 Teresa Ashley
Aug 19, 2017 Richard Cooper
Aug 18, 2017 Amy Chevalier
Aug 14, 2017 Susan Armistead, M.D.
Aug 6, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 27, 2017 Patricia Wirth-Nugent
Jul 27, 2017 p perry
Jul 27, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jul 27, 2017 Tedford Rose
Jul 27, 2017 Dottie Viar
Jul 27, 2017 Susannah Gelbart
Jul 27, 2017 Dianne Borror
Jul 27, 2017 Jon Abbey
Jul 27, 2017 Dorothy Huebner
Jul 27, 2017 robert dowling
Jul 27, 2017 Nancy Gray
Jul 27, 2017 Erik Bjarnar
Jul 27, 2017 Dawn Purney
Jul 27, 2017 Eliza Duncan
Jul 27, 2017 Charlotte Dent
Jul 27, 2017 Connie Walker
Jul 27, 2017 Richard Laba
Jul 27, 2017 Laura Riley
Jul 27, 2017 David Antos
Jul 27, 2017 Elizabeth Frost
Jul 27, 2017 Leonard Morrow
Jul 27, 2017 Lucie Refsland Please pass nationally recognized guidelines for labeling food, thus eliminating confusion and wasted food.
Jul 25, 2017 Liz seff
Jul 4, 2017 Deborah Bratcher
Jul 1, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jun 30, 2017 Sylvia Castle
Jun 29, 2017 Ralph Juliano
Jun 24, 2017 Miriam Feehily
Jun 19, 2017 Christopher Dennis
Jun 19, 2017 Michele Mika
Jun 19, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jun 19, 2017 Mary Jean Sharp
Jun 19, 2017 Irene W. Dowdell
Jun 19, 2017 Jennie deBeausset
Jun 19, 2017 Loraine Lindsey
Jun 19, 2017 R. Denis Cole

back to top

25 Percent Off the Holiday Category
Share this page and help fund research: