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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 1,084
Sponsored by: The Diabetes Site

An estimated 350,000 people in the United States use insulin pumps. These lifesaving devices replace the need for frequent injections by delivering insulin through the pump. It works 24-hours, 7-days-a-week to keep glucose levels under control.

Insulin pumps are effectively part of the body of a person with diabetes. People sleep with them and exercise with them. There are waterproof models that allow for swimming and bathing without disconnecting the device. So, of course, people will travel with the pumps as well, but a recent Transportation Security Administration (TSA) procedure change is making that needlessly complicated.

Previously any passenger for any reason was allowed to request a pat-down search at security checkpoints. Many people with insulin pumps have opted for this choice, as the devices should not go through x-ray machines and research on the safety of the new AIT scanners is inconclusive. But now, TSA officers have the right to deny pat-down requests "if warranted by security considerations." Refusal to go through a scanner allows the TSA to prevent passengers from boarding their flights.

Only a tiny fraction of the 318 million Americans wear insulin pumps, and far fewer take a plane on any given day. The combination of the relative rarity of an insulin pump with the TSA's abysmal turnover rate, 7 or 8% among full-time officers and 20% among part-time, means that many agents may not have encountered an insulin pump before.

And now the TSA's new policy allows them to force people with pumps through potentially harmful scanners.

When the memo detailing the policy change was released, it gave no reason for the TSA's shift in protocol. The TSA said in a statement that most passengers won't be affected by the change: "This will occur in a very limited number of circumstances where enhanced screening is required."

But insulin pump wearers ARE affected. And we have a right to keep our equipment safe from ignorant TSA officers who might deny us a pat-down.

Tell the TSA Administrator to reinstate the opt-out option so diabetics with insulin pumps can travel safely while protecting their life-saving equipment.

Sign Here






To TSA Administrator Peter V. Neffenger,

I am writing to express my concern and disagreement with your recent policy change which allows TSA officers to deny pat-down requests at checkpoints "if warranted by security considerations."

The TSA's statement that, "this will occur in a very limited number of circumstances where enhanced screening is required," shows a lack of empathy and awareness of the diversity of the traveling public, especially those who rely upon delicate medical devices to survive.

Only a tiny fraction of the 318 million Americans wear insulin pumps, and far fewer take a plane on any given day. The combination of the relative rarity of an insulin pump with the TSA's abysmal turnover rate, 7 or 8% among full-time officers and 20% among part-time, means that many agents may not have encountered an insulin pump before.

In the past, any passenger for any reason was allowed to request a pat-down search at security checkpoints. Many people with insulin pumps have opted for this choice, as the devices should not go through x-ray machines and research on the safety of the new AIT scanners is inconclusive. This is a perfectly legitimate reason to refuse to go through a scanner, but your new policy takes away our rights to be assured a pat-down. Refusal to go through a scanner allows the TSA to prevent passengers from boarding their flights.

Must we choose between our lives and the freedom to fly?

Please, reverse your stance on the opt-out protocols so diabetics with insulin pumps can travel safely while protecting their life-saving equipment.

Thank you,

Petition Signatures


Jan 23, 2017 Rogi Rogic
Jan 23, 2017 Nina Domergue
Jan 22, 2017 Patricia Nenadich
Jan 21, 2017 Joyce Brogger
Jan 21, 2017 Matthew McWhirr
Jan 20, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jan 20, 2017 Ken stein
Jan 20, 2017 cindy stein
Jan 19, 2017 Ingrid Bichler
Jan 19, 2017 Christine Leogrande These very expensive, lifesaving devices CANNOT go through scanners!
Jan 19, 2017 Hazel Blanco Incer
Jan 18, 2017 Mita Chakraborti
Jan 17, 2017 Elena Hernandez
Jan 17, 2017 Malchiel Schindler
Jan 17, 2017 Caroline CEDELLE
Jan 17, 2017 Rakesh Chandranatha
Jan 17, 2017 Debra Groff
Jan 16, 2017 Robert .
Jan 16, 2017 Rachel Brennan
Jan 16, 2017 Vivian Muñoz Jean-François
Jan 16, 2017 María Galarce
Jan 16, 2017 Kevin Dahl
Jan 16, 2017 Sudesh Prasad
Jan 16, 2017 Jacquie Begemann
Jan 16, 2017 Elizabeth Delgado
Jan 16, 2017 guyonvarch nathalie
Jan 16, 2017 rexhepi ibrahim
Jan 16, 2017 Ashleigh Heath
Jan 16, 2017 cynthia sloan
Jan 16, 2017 allison alberts
Jan 16, 2017 Carla Marques
Jan 16, 2017 Claire Manwani
Jan 16, 2017 Donna Delin
Jan 15, 2017 Artem Vyzhenko
Jan 15, 2017 Peter Kahigian
Jan 15, 2017 Paulette MacMillan
Jan 15, 2017 Jean Buchanan
Jan 15, 2017 Kat duPasht
Jan 15, 2017 dennis kreiner
Jan 15, 2017 Angeline sieb
Jan 15, 2017 Amanda Salvner
Jan 15, 2017 Martha Strother
Jan 15, 2017 Nicoleta Sava
Jan 15, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jan 15, 2017 Lori Sherry
Jan 15, 2017 Kirsten Kahl
Jan 15, 2017 Clifton McMillan Jr
Jan 15, 2017 (Name not displayed)
Jan 15, 2017 Tracy Birrell
Jan 15, 2017 Carol Gaido-Schmidt

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